Teaching Through the Storm: A Journal of Hope (The by Karen Hale Hankins

By Karen Hale Hankins

This identify describes the dilemmas of school room lifestyles in an try to offer a counterpoint to those that have spun schooling and politics jointly as though systems have been recommendations. It provides an insider point of view at the buoyant hopes of lecturers and the occasionally stark realities they face.

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Teaching Through the Storm: A Journal of Hope (The Practitioner Inquiry Series)

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Extra info for Teaching Through the Storm: A Journal of Hope (The Practitioner Inquiry Series)

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Polkinghorne, Narrative Knowing and the Human Sciences Journal Entry (winter) It was cold, rainy, and gray as I drove to school. I was no more up than the sun and feeling somewhat out of control from a building migraine. Days like that make me wonder what it must be like to have a job where you can tell a secretary to hold your calls for the first hour. I knew that in the next half hour I would have to greet children with all the cheer and compassion I could muster, fill out a morning report, greet a parent or two, calm at least one unruly or unhappy child and begin the instructional part of the day.

There is wide credence given to the view that a person’s thinking is shaped by the environment in which he or she develops. That view supports the notion that language is the primary mediator of learning (Bakhtin, 1981; Vygotsky, 1986; Wertsch, 1991). In most societies, language plays a crucial role in the ways people absorb their culture. “Simply stated in most cultures people learn how to think by listening to and participating in the way in which the people around them talk” (Marshall, Smagorinsky, & Smith, 1995, p.

The ACT Early Project 26 Teaching through the Storm (Kamphouse, 1997) provided us with a number of behavior checklists for each of our children and led data analysis classes to help us discern the information we received from the scales and checklists. The lists categorized each child into one of seven behavioral typologies (Childs, 1999). My classroom was the only one out of those in three participating schools in which all seven typologies were represented. The typologies were labeled well adapted, average, mildly disruptive, disruptive behavior disorder, learning disorder, physical complaints/worry, and severe psychopathology (Kamphouse, 1997).

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